THE HARBOR MONTHLY ISSUE NO.42

I’ve been reflecting on how powerful a mutual love of film can be. A simple, “what was the last thing you watched that stuck with you?” between two cinephiles can forge lasting friendships.

THE HARBOR MONTHLY ISSUE NO.42

I’ve been reflecting on how powerful a mutual love of film can be. A simple, “what was the last thing you watched that stuck with you?” between two cinephiles can forge lasting friendships.

I was recently in London at Harbor’s Turnmills studios where I met a lot of my colleagues who I have worked with but never met in person and more still with whom I had never spoken. They all welcomed me with open arms, lunch invites, and cold beers. So thank you to all my new friends for the hospitality and for sharing your opinions on films with me.

I hope the Harbor Monthly reflects that bond, like a bond between a cinematographer and his colorist or an artist and his heritage. In this issue of the Harbor monthly, we bring you a sample of what Colorist Joe Gawler referred to as “the Ed Lachman experience,” in the form of a conversation between the prolific cinematographer and colorist about how they control mood and emotion through color, contrast, and exposure in Pablo Larraín’s El Conde.

Next, we have a look into how Director Nicolai Iuul and Editor Nate Cali temper each other to cut epic car spots with star power and dynamite visuals (and sometimes actual dynamite).

Our Colorist Andrea Chlebak, alongside Cinematographer Elisha Christian, dissect the inspiration behind their striking imagery from Neon’s Immaculate starring Sydney Sweeney. Their journey in mix media references includes Renaissance paintings, still photography, and films like Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby, and Robert Wise’s The Sound of Music.

We are pleased to introduce a new “advice” column from our Head of Color Science, Matt Tomlinson, who brings you snippets of his thoughts on various technical and lesser-known aspects of image creation. This month, he focuses on HDR.  

Finally, Senior Colorist Roman Hankewycz takes us inside his grandparents’ Ukrainian home and draws a line from the art that surrounded him in childhood to his current vocation. He implores us to remember the Ukrainians still struggling and to stay connected with them through conversation or artistic endeavors.

Thanks always for reading. Oh yeah, and between cinephiles, what was the last thing you watched that stuck with you? Tell me at ellie.powers@harborpicturecompany.com

Enjoy.

– Ellie Powers